Artists and Speakers 2014


Britta Rudolff    |     Shaheen Merali    |    Nick Wilson    |    Rosanna Raymond    |    Denise Ferris    |    Angelique Sansossian    |    Ragimli Esmira Jamal |    Tammam Azzam    |    Oriental Heritage Without Boarders/OHWB    |    Sophie Iremonger    |    Mudi Yahaya    |    Md ‚Mithu‘ Sarowar Jahan    |    Naeemeh Naeemaei    |    Yegane Azadova    |    Miodarg Kuc    |    Refunc    |    Andreas Szagun    |    Juli Saragosa    |   Julia Barco    |    Jai Arun Ravine    |    Christine Kirouac    |    Samuel Kiehoon Lee    |    Randy Lee Cutler    |    Mahmoud Ramadan    |    Charlotte Bank    |    Khaled Mzher    |    Peter Sachsenmeier    |    KUNSTrePUBLIK    |    Deborah Withers    |    Hyelim Kim    |    Lidia Rossner    |    Klaus Zehbe    |    Allison Warden    |    Jacqueline Heerema    |    Michele Trimarchi    |    Pablo Arboleda & Emil Bakev    |    Anne O’Dowd    |    Jazmyne Koch    |    Manuel Sanches    |    Daisy Sutcliffe    |    Abr Ensemble    |    Nagiyev Shahveled

Overview of Schedule with Speaks/Artists here.


Britta Rudolff (Germany/Bahrain)

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Britta Rudolff is Professor for Heritage Management at BTU Cottbus, Managing Director of Think Heritage!, and Advisor to the Minister of Culture, Bahrain. Graduated in heritage conservation and heritage management with a doctorate in cultural geography, her research has focused on heritage construction processes in the framework of UNESCO initiatives. publications | web


Lecture
Heritage as Poetry
Friday, June 6th 2014, 15:00 – 16:00
Video

All art as well as all heritage is essentially poetry, the product of poiesis, of creative thinking and action brought into being. In the arts, often a single act of poiesis creates the artwork while heritage is nurtured in existence by constant re-creation – by continuous processes of poiesis. This paper shall consider the processes of creation in heritage construction and art production and disclose the proximity of the two as different aspects of poiesis, as different aspects of bringing together thinking and identity, as bringing thinking and identity into being.

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Shaheen Merali (UK)

Shaheen Merali . Photo Credit - Katharina Stögmüller

Shaheen Merali is a curator and writer, currently based in London, UK. Previously, he was Head of Exhibitions, Film and New Media at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin (2003-2008) where he curated several exhibitions accompanied by key publications, including The Black Atlantic; Dreams and Trauma- Moving images and the Promised Lands and Re-Imagining Asia, One Thousand years of Separation. Merali was the co-curator of the 6th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2006).
Upon leaving Germany he curated many exhibitions in India and Iran and then embarked upon a period of extensive research and consultation on the conservation and production of a major exhibition of the International Collection of the Birla Academy of Art and Culture, Kolkata (2010- 2012).
His recent exhibitions include Refractions, Moving Images on Palestine, P21 Gallery, London; When Violence becomes Decadent, ACC Galerie, Weimar, Speaking from the Heart, Castrum Peregrini, Amsterdam and (After) Love at Last Sight / Nezeket Ekici Retrospective, PiArtworks , London.
Merali has written catalogue essays on Agathe de Bailliencourt, Nezeket Ekici, Jitish Kallat, Sara Rahbar, TV Santhosh, Cai Yuan and JJ Xi (Madforeal) and others.  Website

Lecture
The Spectre (of Knowledge): Reconsidering the archive
Friday, June 6th 2014, 16:00 – 17:00
Video

When I started to apply the notion of the spectre to a potential subject to be considered by this conference, the archive, it suggested two simultaneous readings: the first was of a roaming spirit – of a visible but disembodied entity (which is the state of the archive’s discourse) – a motif that would provide a final resting place for research, which is the sum of many parts. The second, with its distinguishing as well poetic connotations, is of something that haunts or disturbs our mind, like a ghost. It is about a supernatural relationship to the past. Here, I am suggesting how tricks of the mind and memories play a specific role in re-visiting that which was once real and now remains with us internally and somewhat intransigently. The archive, it seems, has many possibilities and many permeable points of entry, from its resoundingly scientific definition, imbued with a sense of objectivity, to what remains of the subjective elements of the archive, which facilitate a shifting relationship to the archive’s the contents.

The paper examines thinking further on these ideas, the archive as rescued from abandonment, which resonates well with a literal interpretation of the haunted place. Strangely, archives are haunted places – haunted by material that resonates and vibrates with a past that had been occupiedfor archives, like good horror films, manage to make us feel disturbed and unsettled.

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Nick Wilson (UK)

WilsonNick Wilson is Senior Lecturer in Cultural and Creative Industries at the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries (CMCI), King’s College London. His research explores the paradoxical relationship between culture and creativity, with his most recent study (and book, published by OUP) focusing on the British early music movement.


Lecture
Re-enchanting Arts & Heritage through Social Creativity
Friday, June 6th 2014, 17:00 – 18:00
Video

Innovate Heritage encourages us to explore the paradoxical relationship between creativity and culture. On the one hand, we are living at a time of extraordinary and constant market-driven change, where ‘old’ rules simply cannot be relied upon any more. On the other hand, we are increasingly drawn to finding meaning and value in the revival of ‘lost’ traditions, and the legacy of our shared heritage. Against this backdrop, this paper argues for a radical agenda of ‘re-enchanting’ art and heritage through ‘social creativity’. Examples from British early music performance, cultural entrepreneurship and artist-driven ‘playground projects’ are introduced to contextualize discussion.

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Rosanna Raymond (New Zealand/Samoa/UK)

Rosanna  Black and white 14An innovator of the contemporary Pasifika art scene, Raymond has forged a role for herself as a producer and commentator on contemporary Pacific culture from Aotearoa NZ, with working within museums and higher education institutions as an artist, performer, research associate, curator, guest speaker, poet and workshop leader.

 

 

Lecture
Ko Au Te Wharetaonga – I am the Museum
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 16:30 – 17:30
Video

The Artist inside the Museum -The Museum inside the Artist
As an artist, the museum has become a space for my art practice and cultural heritage to come together, the museum a place confluence, the past and the present, the voices of the community, the artist, the intellect, finding space to create, speculate, articulate, mediate, explore and learn.
So with this in mind I will present an aural experience featuring, visual and performative elements, weaving in and out of spoken words, both academic and artistic to create an insight to the practice I have built up working with museums in the UK, Europe, USA and the Pacific over the past 15 years.


Visual Art

Soli i Tai – Soli i Uta (walk on the sea, walk on the land)
Video of Artist | Video of Exhibition

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An interactive multi media work featuring photographic images, poetry costuming and Acti.VA.tion created as a response to the Samoan collections  at the Ethnological Museum Berlin residency in April 2014.The  work crosses boundaries between artistic media and genres, drawing on her New Zealand, European and Samoan heritage. In »Soli I Tai – Soli I Uta,« Raymond  binds the living and the past, bringing all into a dynamic time and space, which can be carried on beyond the museum holdings and into the present. The residency was made possible by a cooperation between the Humboldt Lab Dahlem, the European Research Council Project »Indigeneity in the Contemporary World, and the International Research Center for Advanced Studies on »Interweaving Performance Cultures« at the Freie Universität Berlin.

 

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Denise Ferris (Australia)

APDeniseFerrisAssociate Professor Denise Ferris is an educator and artist living in the Australian High Country, where aspects of her current practice originate. She is the Head of the Australian National University School of Art, Canberra and supervises graduate students in Photography. Her art practice and research is generated from intimate experience and also examines broader social politics. She is interested in how representation conveys emotional effect and in photography’s representational but imaginative capacity. Her photographs are in Australian public collections, the National Gallery, National Library, the Australian War Memorial as well as international collections including District Six Museum, Cape Town and Nara City, Japan.

 

Lecture
Being There: the value of art in mobilising narratives on absence
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 15:30 – 16:30
Video

Stone races, dams and waterways endure as monuments to Chinese mining practices 150 years ago In the Australian Snowy Mountains. Photographs accurately describe this heritage but such realism falls short of ‘being there’ or understanding the lives of the miners. However photography can expand imaginative possibilities in a project of retrieval, disclosing presence where only absence is now felt.
Discussing a proposed multi-disciplinary research project Visible Voices I examine how photography offers more than documentary evidence. I contend visual art provokes new engagements in the reconstruction of past narratives for a non-visitation audience. The miners will be revealed through cross-disciplinary research, and crucial is visual art’s, imagination, emotion and impact.


Visual Art

Absent Spaces: Invisible Lives
Video of Artist | Video of Exhibition

Celestial SpacesThe series was shown timed and in a sequence that offered a simple stills image traverse across the landscape and in changing weather.

The photographic series Absent Spaces: Invisible Lives is the result of a residency hosted by the National Parks and Wildlife Service. During 2012 at various intervals I stayed at Wolgols hut in Kiandra and photographed in all weather and over four months specifically the sites mined by the Chinese in the 1860’s. Walking this exposed landscape revealed the domestic and mining residue on site, as well as the harsh climatic environment at Kiandra. However the wonder of this site and the questions that remain, wonder in another sense, warrant close scrutiny.

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Angelique Sanossian (Syria/Lebanon)

PicsArt_1383750627106Syrian Armenian Photographer currently breathing in Beirut, took part in various solo and collective exhibitions since 2007. Her style in photography is always based on covering humanitarian issues, passing a message to the society to help it move forward. There is always a story behind each project she puts a light on. Website

 


Visual Art

MOUHARAMAT
Video of Exhibition

4“There is a charm about the forbidden that makes it unspeakably desirable”. “Moharamat” is an Arabic word, which is lost in translation but aims at depicting the illicitness of certain acts that one should be punished for.

“Mouharamat” reveals the hypocrisy and incoherent logic of our world. While one is punished for a forbidden glimpse at the human body, another is rewarded for the destruction of heritage in the aim of spreading God’s word.

“Moharammat” is a plead for putting destruction to a halt, a plead to save our past and to respect the forbidden; for “To sin by silence when they should protest makes cowards of men” and I refuse to be a coward.
THIS IS MY PROTEST

 

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Ragimli Esmira Jamal (Azerbaijan)

10335952_735063489877279_695892115_nRagimli Esmira Jamal was born in 1966 in Baku. After finishing secondary school she worked at the Azerbaijan Industrial Carpet Enterprise as carpet-weaver. In 1983 she entered Azerbaijan State Art College by the name of Azim Azim-zadeh. 1987-1989 Esmira worked at the Puppet Theatre as an artist-decorator. 1989-1995 she studied at the Azerbaijan Art State University and graduated in with the degree of industrial –draughts artist. Continued art activity she took part in exhibitions and 1998 became the member of Azerbaijan Artist Union.

 


Visual Art

Azerbaijan Weaving
Video of Exhibition

10344921_735061516544143_1292396549_nAzerbaijan carpet weaving, being an inherent element of the culture of Azerbaijanian people, is a family tradition transferred orally and through practice. Weaving, and carpet weaving in particular, has become dominant and the most important aesthetically valuable art form and creative activity for the Azerbaijan people. Although there have been many rapid changes in lifestyle in the 21st century, carpet production is the main sphere of the artistic expression and an amazing cultural constant, sometime used to decorate even modern interiors today. Azerbaijanian carpets turned into the symbol of the Azerbaijan nation, differentiating with its high aesthetic value, special patterns, pileless and fleecy forms.

 

 

 

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Tammam Azzam (Syria/Arab Emirates)

Following the outbreak of IMG_6311violence in Syria, Azzam has used his artistic practice to reflect on the worsening situation. The artist has been working increasingly with digital media and has often referenced street art, recognising both of these mediums as powerful and direct tools for protest, which are also difficult to suppress. In early 2013, Azzam made headlines world wide when his work Freedom Graffiti went viral on social media. The work was one of a series, Syrian Museum, in which he placed imagery taken from masterpieces of Western art history into photographs of scenes of devastation across Syria, to both highlight the destruction of Syria’s cultural heritage and to juxtapose some of the greatest achievements of humanity with the pain it is also capable of inflicting. Gallery | Website

Visual Art
Syrian Museum
Video of Exhibition

Syrian Museum - Klimt, Freedom GraffitiThe canvases of Syrian artist Tammam Azzam are experiments in the application of various media. Unusual components such as rope, clothes pins and other found objects are employed to create depth, texture and space, achieving a striking balance between the ordinary objects the artist portrays and the grand terrain that he evokes. For Azzam, such a methodology facilitates the creation of an artwork as a “hybrid form,” one that is capable of borrowing and multiplying as it evolves.

Born in Damascus in 1980, Tammam Azzam lives and works in Dubai. Selected solo and group exhibitions include Ayyam Gallery London (2013); the 30th Biennal of Graphic Arts, Slovenia (2013); Ayyam Gallery Al Quoz, Dubai (2012, 2009); Ayyam Gallery DIFC, Dubai (2011); Ayyam Gallery Beirut (2010); Ayyam Gallery Damascus ( 2010).

 

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Oriental Heritage Without Borders/OHWB

imageLOGOEstablished in 2012, Oriental Heritage Without Borders e.V. is a non-profit cultural and scientific association based in Berlin and formed by a group of enthusiastic scholars and researchers, all with different educational backgrounds, whom share a great interest as well as concern for the rich culture and heritage of the Orients.

The purpose of the Association is to promote and encourage the conservation, safeguard and sustainable management of both the tangible and intangible cultural heritage as well as the natural heritage of the oriental region, especially heritage in danger and in post conflict.

OHWB as a community goes beyond cultural and geographical borders, and succeeds based on its committed and active members who work closely together in: I. Finding cultural similarities rather than political differences; as well as II. Thriving through the diversity in our commonality. Thus differences, or diversity in that matter, is respected and understood without coercion. And it’s that attitude which we seek and which has been the founding building blocks of Oriental Heritage Without Borders. Website


Panel Discussion

Syrian Art & Heritage in Danger, Panel Discussion
(Moderated by Sepideh Zarrin Ghalam)
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 11:00 – 12:00
Video

It’s been three years now that the world is witnessing the huge loss of human, cultural and natural resources in Syria, a tragic event which strikes deliberately the identity and soul of its people. There is no doubt about the urgency of the humanitarian activities to fulfill the basic physical needs, yet the question could be asked whether artistic and cultural activities could assist in feeding the soul of people, an undertaking which its necessity, feasibility and outcomes might be underestimated in times of conflict.

As one can follow within the creative activities of young Syrians, either artists or ordinary people, there is no stop to the artistic and cultural productions and such continuity, at these hard times brings with it the message of hope. Such hope builds into this panel’s discussion topic toward the possibility of providing more opportunities for fostering and empowering the already existing potentials with the help of artists and other innovative design professionals.


Visual Art

Urban Collective Memories
Video of Curator | Video of Exhibition

CairoCities have always been storehouses for our shared memories and act as our sources of daily inspiration and motivation. Urban Collective Memories is a photo/sound exhibition, which artistically demonstrates urban culture, life style and daily activities in three cities: Beirut, Cairo and Tehran. This project employs the means of image and sound in order to connect urban elements and collective memory with heritage as a collection which seeks to better express our common intangible heritage.

The works (both photos and sounds) are sent by artists, students and OHWB’s members, who live in these cities and are interested in subjects like photography, sound in cites, architecture, culture, art and heritage.

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Sophie Iremonger (UK/Ireland/Germany)

sunbeam-0223Born 1983 Dublin, BA fine art from the National college of Art and design, Berlin based, Sophie Iremonger explores junctures between inhabited/uninhabited lands. Creating her own lexicon of animal imagery, looking at nature is the works most important component. The springboard from which her other themes: eroticism, glamour, nostalgia, are explored. Website


Visual Art

Neonderthal
Video of Artist | Video of Exhibition

Using acrylic, collage and print techniques, this work perverts core Pop art techniques (repeated imagery, but made by hand,not machine using a new print method) whilst retaining the Pop-art mass production aesthetic  and  the movements desire for a fresh new art of now. A eulogy to nostalgia, glamour and the wilderness combined with an energetic processed neon vision. Seriously primordial yet frothed with the artificial flavor of mass media ephemera- these mismatching parts create an erotic art Frankenstein. Neanderthal in neon= Neonderthal.

 

 

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Mudi Yahaya (Nigeria)

Mudi Yahaya PortraitMudi Yahaya is a cultural activist whose video work and photography has evolved from social documentary essay to critical conceptual photography and experimental film. Mallam Mudi’s work explores interpretations of African hybrid identities and their varied visual dialects, currencies, and vocabularies. Investigating the aesthetic imagery that connects postcolonial African identities in spaces mediated by still photography and cinema linked to violence, intolerance, gender and race matters.

Mallam Mudi’s body of work interjects semiotic symbolisms that gesture to religious iconography, indigenous cultural signifiers and sociocultural manipulation.

 

 

Seminar Lecture
The Curatorial Colour Curtain – Who Curates Post-Colonial Contemporary African Art?
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

The focus of the paper would be DOCUMENTA as a construct and it’s relationship to hierarchies of culture, race, gender and the politics of post colonial engagement.  The paper would trace the unique history of DOCUMENTA and it’s sustained interaction with the complexities of race and identity, underlining how the colonial construct still shapes contemporary ideas and varied notions of how Africa is positioned and positions itself in contemporary cultural production. Also to be discussed would the divisive role of uber curatorial practices and how this determine what is in the “centre” and what remains in the “periphery” as regards to cultural and political potency of non western contemporary artistic production.

 

Visual Art
For Crown + Country   |   Conrads Circus
Video of Artist | Video of Exhibition

For Crown + Country 09The photographic essay “…For Crown + Country” is an exploration into the role of memory and fiction examining how photography was an active agent in the visual construction of colonialisation and the extent to which the colonial enterprise depended on Photography. The legacy of photography reveals the burden the camera has wrestled with, in telling the truth. This notion remains a contested site, as the camera simply rarely tells the truth and thus alters history. This begs the questions “Can history be rewritten?” and “Where does memory start and fiction begin?”. Alternatively the essay also hints at how many lives have been lost on issues of “For Crown and Country!”.

The photographic essay “Conrads Circus” is an exploration into the power and influence of Joseph Conrads singular perception of Africa and its enduring lingering influence on stereotypes even in today’s world.

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Md ‚Mithu‘ Sarowar Jahan (Bangladesh)

Mithu_Sefl ImageMd ‚Mithu‘ Sarowar Jahan is studying at the Brandenburg University of Technology, currently researching on the conservation issue of involving local community in the Sundarbans World Heritage Site, Bangladesh. Previously his had an exhibition in Germany. He is the 1st prize winner of German Embassy photo competition in Dhaka. His photographs have been used in a publication and in many brochures home and abroad. He travels extensively throughout Bangladesh, Central Asia, Middle East and Europe. Thus, the opportunities to frame the moments – Human Lives & Nature have been his main inspiration for his photography.


Visual Art

Life on Sundarbans
Video of Exhibition

Inno 1The Sundarbans provides sustainable livelihoods for millions of people in the vicinity of the site and acts as a shelter belt to protect the people from storms, cyclones, tidal surges, sea water seepage and intrusion. The area provides livelihood in certain seasons for large numbers of people living in small villages surrounding the property, working variously as wood-cutters, fisherman, honey gatherers, leaves and grass gatherers. It is the home of Bengal Tigers, huge Estuarine Crocodile, Spotted Deer and Otter. There are 250 Species of birds are found in the forest. (WHC)

Local community involvement in terms of sustainable conservation for this Natural Heritage is now a big concern. Ironically, local intangible cultural heritage around the WHS has been always out of focus due to lack of interest from the authority level. We should create the awareness about the sense of belongings of this heritage site among the communities lives on the Resources of the WHS.

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Naeemeh Naeemaei (Iran)

portrait2Born in Tehran, Iran, in 1984, Naeemeh Naeemaei received her BA in art from Tehran Art University in 2006 where her major was sculpture. The subject of her last series of sculptures at the university was the “Decay of Plants.” Upon completion of these sculptures, she began her first paintings on the same theme. Then she began the series of twelve paintings about endangered species that led to her first solo exhibition “Dreams Before Extinction” at the Henna Gallery in Tehran in December 2011. This show was favorably reviewed in the Tehran journal Art of Tomorrow. She is active in Iran’s environmental movement and involved with several organizations that seek to raise awareness about endangered species and other environmental issues.


Visual Art

Dreams Before Extinction
Video of Exhibition

Siberian CraneDissolving the artificial boundary between human society and wild nature is the task of “Dreams Before Extinction,” a series of paintings about endangered species by the Iranian artist Naeemeh Naeemaei. Through a deeply personal visual narrative that is disturbing for both its intimacy and its boldness, she herself bravely crosses the dividing line between humans and wild nature, to awaken awareness and emotional concern not only for the animals in question, but also for the environment as a whole. Her own vulnerability and personal involvement in this endeavor impel us to experience more deeply the pain and suffering of all life forms that are threatened by our blind obedience to unsustainable models of economic growth and continued disregard for the fate of the environment.
“Dreams Before Extinction” provides us with stunning new examples of the ways these issues can be infused with emotional force and broad cultural meaning, even within the context of political cultures and religious beliefs that may be resistant or hostile to environmental activism and cultural change. Her paintings achieve this catharsis by creating an engaging personal narrative that expresses the fear and loneliness she herself feels in the face of the imminent extinction of these animals, an event which in her view augurs ill for the survival of human society itself.

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Yegane Azadova (Azerbaijan)

541467_10202190901712414_611098127_nYegane Azadova is an artist from Baku, Azerbaijan, has worked since 1991 in painting and textile restoration. She has gained her Bachelor degree from Azerbaijan State University of Culture and Art, worked at State Academy of Arts, Center for Scientific Restoration and previously in the World of Azerbaijan Gallery. Currently she is doing her PhD in Department of Art History at the Free University of Berlin


Visual Art

Mythological Images
Video of Artist | Video of Exhibition

IMG_000111In 2007 during the JFDP fellowship in U.S. 2007 Yegana Azadova conducted a research concerning pre-Columbian textile and recently she has a number of art works about this theme. These works represent synthesis of textile and painting, which can be considered as an innovation in the field of art.

In her works she transforms her mythological images in elements where real and unreal, living and inanimate elements are put together, creating very discrepant emotions, which are the materialization of the sensible ecstasy. With the mixture of carpet and painting she took a new way, handwriting and style to the history of fine arts, connected with national traditions of Azerbaijan, gone with its own roots far to depth.

 

 

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Miodrag Kuc (Serbia/Germany)

Dipl.-Ing. Miodrag  Kuč, MSc. Urban Studies (1977) is an interdisciplinary artist and urban theorist trained as architect/urban planner in various cultural settings. His work explores the role of ephemeral structures in uncertain urban conditions and spatial appropriations of marginal social groups. He is founder of the studio ParaArtFormations which moves at the intersection of urban studies, performative-planning, artistic interventions and micropolitics. Website

Spacial Architecture
K67-Urban Router
Video of Artist

KioskK67_Urban Router is a mobile platform for urban investigations and actions, currently operating in the indeterminate space of Moabiter Stadtgarten by involving site-specific actors into collective cartographic experience together with international artists, urban researchers and citizens of Moabit.

In attempt to bridge the gap between publicly accessible Moabiter Stadtgarten and newly established cultural institution ZKU (built under different programs and spatial regimes) project K67_Urban Router has been established as communication interface, research node and in-situ archive.

In the period May-Oct 2013, a local ‘deep-map’ was developed, presenting users behaviour, social interactions and conflicts, archiving ephemeral interventions and (re)-communicating historical traces.

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Refunc (Netherlands/Germany)

IMG_0677REFUNC is a laboratory for design based on the idea that everything can be used to create another thing. REFUNC creates experimental structures based on local waste material flows. REFUNC provides a second life for found or thrown-away objects. REFUNC operates on the borders of architecture, art and design.

Origin for designs are found in the object itself, by listening to its own composition, history, or local and social context. REFUNC  needs a problem to play with, creative improvisation with locally available waste materials lead the way to our often unpredictable results. Wherever you can find garbage, REFUNC does research and workshops on creative recycling. Website

Seminar Lecture
The World without a Manual
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 11:00 – 12:00
Video

Garbage architecture is a discipline on the edge of architecture, design, and art. We perceive our name REFUNC as a universal method to refunctionalize all locally available materials which are no longer appreciated as garbabe. We as troubleshooters like to solve problems, not make new ones, especially in a socially complex surrounding.

For us garbage architecture makes sense in a world where raw materials are getting scarce. We love nature and are much more inspired by naturally grown structures than man-made ones, but we consider ourselves more logical than ecological. It is just a logical and very necessary action to refunctionalize as many garbage materials and objects before all their qualities and specific values get lost in not always clever recycling proecesses.

With all our projects we listen to the things we find, but as well to the context where we work. Context can be very divers, social, geographical, ecological, microbiological, or just taking care of and listen to the old lady next door. We sometimes learn much more from the social context than at any university.

The old men at the sea close to our atelier  taught  me about the moods of the coast with its effects. My daughter taught me with her placenta what a perfect house is. Kenyan metal crafters impressed me by flattening a steel drum into sheet metal by cutting and then putting it on the road to be flattened by car tyres.

It looks like it has to with experience, age, wisdom. Or simply the ability to share and of course to listen.


Spacial Architecture

Silo-City
Video of Artist

DSC01514Experimental living concept in the context of mobile and dynamic architecture
Scheveningen, The Hague, Netherlands, realization March 2013
First Mobile Location Berlin-Moabit, Germany, July 2013

As a contraposition to the standard perception of architecture and as a reaction to a dynamic life as garbage architect and international 3D troubleshooter, I developed a dynamic and mobile living structure from a grain silo and a selection of local waste materials. Various simple but logical technical systems enable the  silo to be almost independent of civilization, e.g. the shower which works on 5 liter circulated water. In order to look from a different angle at the standard way of living, I started to live with my daughter in the experimental house, which we moved to Berlin at the end of july 2013. The ‘silo city’ project in Berlin questions the general dynamics in housing and public space, inviting contrasting groups of society to experience the other side of mobility and architecture, from doctors to lawyers, through workers and gardeners to politicians and musicians.

 

 

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Andreas Szagun (Germany)

Sz-Farbe

Born 1961 in Berlin-Moabit, living there until today
Interested in local and German history since earliest time, member of the “Geschichtswerkstatt Tiergarten”
Photographing of changing in Moabit since 1981
Former railroader, interested in German railway-history. Booklet about the deportation-tracks on freight train station Berlin-Moabit


Walking Tour

Deportation-Tracks on the Freight Train Station Moabit

Mahnmal_Put-300The presentation will give you an overview about the history of the freight train station Berlin-Moabit and his darkest chapter, the deportation of 32 000 Jewish People from Berlin to the concentration camps and the role of the German railway. You will also hear some testimonies of surviving Jews, who were deported from Moabit. After the presentation we will walk to some of the locations and there will be given also information and shown pictures.

 

 

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Juli Saragosa (Italy/Ukraine/Canada/Germany)

Juli Saragosa

Curator: Juli Saragosa is a film and video artist with a burning desire to foster community through grassroots organizing and curation of DIY film festivals such as Project8 and entzaubert, teaching media arts workshops at LIFT, VIVO, and Film Arche, and university classes at UBC and SFU. Website

 

 

 

 

Film Program Curation
Food Diaspora
Friday, June 6th 2014, 21:30
Video of Exhibition + Film Program

The General Ridiculousness of Trying to Define Asian American AnythingFor transnational subjects, certain foods are reminiscent of home, the land left behind even generations ago. Ancestral ties are bound to specific cultural methods of food preparation and the intimate interaction of eating together, and from the outsider’s viewpoint, form a basis upon which to stereotype, label and categorize. The films and videos of this program display a diversity of approaches to the complex relationship between cultures and the foods associated with them, prejudices that can accompany them, the meanings of words in translation, and access to basic resources.

Still image from Jai Arun Ravine’s “The General Ridiculousness of Trying to Define Asian American Anything.”

 

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
FINDING A PLACE TO SLEEP

FINDING A PLACE TO SLEEP Year: 2013
Language: English / Ukrainian / Deutsch Untertitel
Duration: 7:13

Based on stories my grandmother told, I re-imagine while working as a cleaner, the experiences of my ancestors living during the Holodomor (forced famine) in Ukraine during the Soviet era. The “film” image is re-invented through digital video to enact a sense of ambiguity between authenticity and fiction, as can also be present in the act of oral storytelling.

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Julia Barco (Columbia/Mexico)

Website

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
Chelas y pañuelos / Beer and Hankies
Video of Exhibition + Film Program

Chelas y pañuelos_Beer and HankiesYear: 2002
Language: none
Duration: 4:15

In the midst of a traditional Oaxacan fiesta, there is flowing beer, flicking hankies and subtle interactions between dancers. Using recurring visuals of women making festival preparations and dancing together, the film takes on an erotic quality.

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
SLOW FOOD, maiz nuestro de cada día

Year: 2008
Language: none
Duration: 11:54

In Southern México women spend many hours each day, preparing the perfect corn meal to make perfect tortillas – the texture of life itself.

 

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Jai Arun Ravine (US)

Website

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
TOMBOI GATOEY MANGO Episode 1

TOMBOI GATOEY MANGO Episode 1Year: 2010
Country: USA
Language: English / Thai
Duration: 3:17

This video is about the way my mother peels mangoes and the meanings of กะเทย/”gatoey.” I read a definition of กะเทย/”gatoey” (more commonly transliterated as “kathoey”) from Se-Ed’s Modern Thai-English Dictionary, and a passage from Toms and Dees: Transgender Identity and Female Same-Sex Relationships in Thailand by Megan J. Sinnott. I use part of “Sao Dok Kum Tai,” a track from Thai Pop Spectacular: 1960s-1980s.

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
THE GENERAL RIDICULOUSNESS OF TRYING TO DEFINE ASIAN AMERICAN ANYTHING

THE GENERAL RIDICULOUSNESS OF TRYING TO DEFINE ASIAN AMERICAN ANYTHING_Year: 2012
Language: English titles, none spoken language
Duration: 3:12

A video ad campaign for ChaoKoh, the artist’s favourite brand of coconut milk, was developed during a collaboration of dialogue and writings on the “exuberance” of being and the commodification of an “Asian American” category or aesthetic. They write: I used the opportunity to get on my roof and be ridiculous, to risk being “too Asian” and “not Asian enough”, too obscure and too specific.

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Christine Kirouac (Canada)

Website

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
DON’T GO AWAY
Video of Exhibition + Film Program

DON’T GO AWAYYear: 2011
Country: Canada
Language: English
Duration: 25:15

Coming from a passionate French-Canadian restaurant family, Kirouac’s experiences of familial relations have been continually filtered through the ubiquitous, yet intimate act of cooking.  This video combines these histories and emotions into a mediated conversation with her deceased father “Fernie,” in his role as the co-host of an outdoor cooking show “Charcoal Chefs,” (1976-78). The one surviving episode is interplayed and re-formulated with scripted footage so that the artist can meet her adopted father at an intersection between analog and digital.

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Samuel Kiehoon Lee (Canada/Korea)

Website

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
HOW TO MAKE KIMCHI ACCORDING TO MY KUN~UMMA
Video of Exhibition + Film Program

HOW TO MAKE KIMCHI ACCORDING TO MY KUN~UMMAYear: 2002
Language: English / Korean
Duration: 18:11

Fun, Family, and Food are the focus of this witty yet informative look into Korean culture. Bong Ja Lee is the filmmaker’s Kun-Umma (auntie) and she makes for a delightful subject in this short digital documentary. The film delivers not only a recipe for kimchi, but also tells the story of an immigrant woman juggling with being a grandmother, a leader in the Korean-Canadian community, and an aunt to her pestering nephew who’s attempting to document her life.

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Randy Lee Cutler (Canada)

Website

Film (Food Diaspora Program)
Kitchen Semiotics

Kitchen SemioticsYear: 2011
Language: English
Duration: 15:47

This durational performance video is staged in the artist’s kitchen where she proceeds through the alphabet consuming a food and drink for each letter. As Cutler samples her provisions, a voice over offers political or cultural information that sheds light on global food trends. Inspired by Martha Rosler’s 1975 video Semiotics of the Kitchen, this work encourages a critical consciousness of consumption.

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Mahmoud Ramadan (Syria/Belgium)

Mahmoud Ramadan

Mahmoud Ramadan is Managing Playmaker SPRL for Community Mobilization and Strategic Planning in Brussels. He is currently the Strategic Development Coordinator of the Syria Initiative, responsible for the design and development of the initiative as well as building and strengthening the peace activist networks in Syria. He is supporting National Agenda for the future of Syria with UN-ESCWA in the field of strategic local development.

 

Lecture & Panel Discussion
Syrian Art & Heritage in Danger
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 11:00 – 12:00
Video

It’s been three years now that the world is witnessing the huge loss of human, cultural and natural resources in Syria, a tragic event which strikes deliberately the identity and soul of its people. There is no doubt about the urgency of the humanitarian activities to fulfill the basic physical needs, yet the question could be asked whether artistic and cultural activities could assist in feeding the soul of people, an undertaking which its necessity, feasibility and outcomes might be underestimated in times of conflict.

As one can follow within the creative activities of young Syrians, either artists or ordinary people, there is no stop to the artistic and cultural productions and such continuity, at these hard times brings with it the message of hope. Such hope builds into this panel’s discussion topic toward the possibility of providing more opportunities for fostering and empowering the already existing potentials with the help of artists and other innovative design professionals.

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Charlotte Bank (Germany/Switzerland)

Charlotte BankCharlotte Bank is an art historian and independent curator, living and working between Berlin and Geneva. Until 2011, she was partly based in Damascus. Her work is focused on modern and contemporary artistic practice from the Middle East with a special emphasis on the independent contemporary art scene since 2000 in its global context She is a member of the curatorial team of the Visual Arts Festival Damascus, an independent art festival launched in 2010 in Damascus that now exists as a nomadic platform for artistic exchange. Since 2013 she is member of the SNF Sinergia research project “Other Modernities: Patrimony and Practices of Visual Expression Outside the West” at the University of Geneva.

Lecture & Panel Discussion
Syrian Art & Heritage in Danger
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 11:00 – 12:00
Video

It’s been three years now that the world is witnessing the huge loss of human, cultural and natural resources in Syria, a tragic event which strikes deliberately the identity and soul of its people. There is no doubt about the urgency of the humanitarian activities to fulfill the basic physical needs, yet the question could be asked whether artistic and cultural activities could assist in feeding the soul of people, an undertaking which its necessity, feasibility and outcomes might be underestimated in times of conflict.

As one can follow within the creative activities of young Syrians, either artists or ordinary people, there is no stop to the artistic and cultural productions and such continuity, at these hard times brings with it the message of hope. Such hope builds into this panel’s discussion topic toward the possibility of providing more opportunities for fostering and empowering the already existing potentials with the help of artists and other innovative design professionals.

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Khaled Mzher (Syria/Germany)

Khaled MzherKhaled Mzher is a Syrian filmmaker based in Berlin since 2012 and a recent directing student in the “German Film and TV Academy Berlin” (dffb). He graduated from the Higher Institute of Theatrical Arts in Damascus in 2007, then after he studied film directing until 2011 in the “National Film, TV and Theatre School in Łódź/Poland” (PWSFTviT).

 

 

Lecture & Panel Discussion
Syrian Art & Heritage in Danger
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 11:00 – 12:00
Video

It’s been three years now that the world is witnessing the huge loss of human, cultural and natural resources in Syria, a tragic event which strikes deliberately the identity and soul of its people. There is no doubt about the urgency of the humanitarian activities to fulfill the basic physical needs, yet the question could be asked whether artistic and cultural activities could assist in feeding the soul of people, an undertaking which its necessity, feasibility and outcomes might be underestimated in times of conflict.

As one can follow within the creative activities of young Syrians, either artists or ordinary people, there is no stop to the artistic and cultural productions and such continuity, at these hard times brings with it the message of hope. Such hope builds into this panel’s discussion topic toward the possibility of providing more opportunities for fostering and empowering the already existing potentials with the help of artists and other innovative design professionals.

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Peter Sachsenmeier (Germany/Switzerland)

sachsenmeierProf Peter Sachsenmeier is a strategist, expert in complex technology management, industrial innovator and visionary; also, CEO of Switzerland based management consultancy IMAG Information Management AG, and entrepreneur. At the same time, Prof. Peter Sachsenmeier continues to teach information management and large programme management at major universities in the UK, Germany, and outside Europe. He has worked for the UN and several of its agencies, including the World Bank, UNESCO, WHO, and UNEP. He taught in the World Heritage Studies programme at Cottbus since its inception, and in 2004 was appointed a management Professor by the Faculty of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Town Planning. A polyglot and at home in Oxford England where he started to teach at the eponymous university right at the beginning of his professional career, he has a unique international network of contacts, access to investment projects and advanced technology research. His recent work deals with smart city technologies in an increasingly urban world, and with the business processes needed to manage sensory environments, e.g. in advanced manufacturing Industry 4.0

Seminar Lecture
Heritage and Identity as Important Factors in a Rapidly Urbanizing World
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

The world today is characterized by rapid urbanization. Over the next two decades, another two billion people will move into cities, i.e. the exploding megacities in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and into more slowly transforming cities elsewhere. While much discussion has already taken place about technological or governance solutions to make cities more intelligent and sustainable, the human aspect has often been neglected. In fact, spaces, cohesion, communities are the social glue that keeps these cities together because they create identity and a sense of belonging and ownership. Heritage has a very important role to play in this. The presentation will outline challenges and solutions, as well as a elements of a programme to make a bigger contribution in this field.

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KUNSTrePUBLIK (Germany)

KunstrepublikKUNSTrePUBLIK is a registered non-profit oganization and artist collective. The group’s formation was precipitated by their initial project, Skulpturenpark Berlin_Zentrum, a non-traditional exhibition venue on 62 vacant lots of downtown real estate, on what was formerly the “death strip” within the Berlin Wall. Since 2006, the group has conceived and realized many site-specific exhibitions, which have pulled from their extensive research of the site’s history and its present in-between status. Through their activities in the park, the group’s members have gone on to engage in other constellations and community-based activities, including education, urban planning, art making and curation.

They have realized projects in Washington D.C. as part of  5×5 by DCARTS, in Lahore, Pakistan as part of Vasl Arts Residency, in Halle / Saale as part of the Werkleitz Festival, in Jakarta as part of the Jakarta Biennale and currently they are working in the Ruhr Area to realize Archipelago Invest as part of Urbane Künste Ruhr.

In 2012 part of the group founded ZK/U – Zentrum fur Kunst und Urbanistik (Centre for Arts and Urbanistics) in a former railway station in Berlin-Moabit. The space is a venue, artist-residency and site of longterm research on questions dealing with the arts and the city. Website | ZK/U | Archipel Invest

Seminar Lecture
Where, if not now
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

The 21st century is going to see a rapid growth in urban populations in most of the non-European countries, whilst the former industrial nations are looking at a restructuring of their cities according to major paradigm shifts in production and population. These dynamics – whether growing or shrinking ones – are mostly driven by economical interests in its various forms. Since 2006 KUNSTrePUBLIK has realized various projects in urban, public contexts, that deal with aspects which are increasingly unrepresented, because they stand in the way of immediate and countable economic success: historical awareness, representation of minorities, informality, non-profitable engagement. KUNSTrePUBLIK will be presenting some of these projects from Pakistan, Indonesia, USA and the Ruhr Area to open a discussion on the importance of historical reference and minority representation in urban developments.

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Deborah Withers (UK)

debi

Deborah Withers is a researcher, writer, publisher and curator based in the UK. Since 2007 she has worked in the community heritage sector focusing specifically on feminist archives. She is currently trustee of the Bristol-based Feminist Archive South and is writing a book entitled Accessing the Already-There: Feminist Generations, Transmission and Digital Culture. Website

 

 

Seminar Lecture
Contemporary Intangible Heritage and Archiving Memory: Music making in the UK Women’s Liberation Movement
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

This lecture draws upon research into the music making communities of the UK Women’s Liberation Movement, 1970-1989. My presentation will explore how the cultural production created within an iconic feminist social movement can be interpreted as intangible cultural heritage (ICH). Drawing on the frameworks outlined in the 2003 UNESCO convention for safeguarding intangible cultural heritage, I argue that it is vital to critically examine the specific processes through which ICH is transmitted across generations. This is done in order to fully apprehend the risks, fragilities and vulnerabilities that often characterize the (dis) organization, concentration and distillation of memory formations whose survival is located in active practices of transmission within communities that are often fragmented and complexly constituted across multiple differences.

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Hyelim Kim (South Korea/UK)

YL8N3046nTaegŭm performer, composer and researcher, Hyelim Kim, is opening new possibilities for Korean music by using the taegŭm (a horizontal bamboo flute). Kim is receiving attention for taking a leading role in breathing new life into Korean traditional music. She was selected as Pioneering Artist by the Korean Arts Council and Kumho Young Artist. She was also awarded the New York Omi Residency and was invited as a musician for a live session on BBC Radio 3’s celebrated Late Junction and London Jazz Festival. Kim received her PhD from School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London and teaches Ethnomusicology at the same university.This performance at the Innovate Heritage conference features diverse repertories from traditional to contemporary compositions to explain the way that Korean traditional music has been recontextualized in a contemporary and increasingly globalized world. Website

 

 

Seminar Lecture
Korean Contemporary Interpretations of Traditional Music/Performance
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

The taegŭm, a horizontal bamboo flute, is considered one of the most representative of Korea’s traditional instruments. Its many musical roles   throughout a long history are complemented by its use in contemporary music. This paper explores how an instrument so full of history can be accepted as a tool for creating new music in the present era, and how its soundworld and the techniques associated with it can be developed. I explore the creative processes of contemporary music making through a series of collaborations I have developed with musicians from Asian, electro-acoustic, jazz, and Western art music traditions. In such intercultural performances (after Turner 1988), participants face, according to Richard Schechner (2003) a variety of issues regarding musical and social relationships around performance. Most significantly for my research activity, improvisation, as a compositional method, ‘encompasses a vast network of   practices’ (Nettl, 1998: xi) that surround the complexity of musical communication. Through DVD and CD recordings, I illustrate an empirical approach to performance- as-research, involving improvisation and collaborative composition in a way that recontextualizes traditional Korean music in a contemporary and increasingly globalized world. Using Schechner as my theoretical model, I explore the resulting performance as a continuum that provoked ecological dynamics framed in regard to the relationship between composer and performer, and between performer and audience.

Performances
1. Ch’ŏngsŏnggok, Traditional
2. Taegŭm Sanjo, Traditional
3. ‘Pochagi’ for taegŭm, electronics and visuals composed by Hyelim Kim
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 19:50 – 20:30
Video

Ch’ŏngsŏnggokis a piece for solo taegŭm, a large transverse bamboo flute, or tanso, a small notched bamboo vertical flute, in which the performer plays the song T’aepyŏnggaan octave higher with variations on the melody. T’aepyŏnggais a classical vocal piece that was highly appreciated by the literati of the Korean Chosŏn dynasty. The piece is also called Ch’ŏngsŏnggokbecause of its clear timbre – generated by the taegŭmsound in the high register. In addition to finger holes, the taegŭm has an additional hole called the ch’ŏnggong covered by a membrane made from river reed: the vibration of the membrane produces a unique sound called ch’ŏngsori, and this sound becomes prominent when the player uses high registers.

Sanjo, Korean representative music for solo instruments, was developed in the 19th century. It is thought to have been developed from shinawi, a form of improvisation played in shamanistic ceremonies in the Chŏlla province, in the southwestern part of the Korean peninsula. Originally, Sanjo was improvised music but now the forms are set. It has five movements which increase in tempo Chinyangjo,Chungmori, Chungjungmori and Chajinmori

Pochagi’ is a Korean patchwork cloth that can be used as a wrapping cloth, and this piece explores the concept of pochagi, extended to mean a container that can capture the diverse sounds of Korean music. The basic material for the piece is the Korean traditional bamboo flute, taegŭm. The acoustic instrument represents, to me, the characteristic Korean sounds; the instrument is foregrounded to produce impromptu melodies that descend in various ways from traditional repertories. Meanwhile, the electronic sounds function as a magnifying glass, reflecting the minute layers of sound. In this piece, I attempted to bridge several dichotomies inherent in the flute and in traditional music – complexes of purity/noise, tradition/modernity and delight/sadness.

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Lidia Rossner (US/Germany)

Lidia_RossnerLidia Rossner (b. 1969, Sofia, Bulgaria; lived in San Diego, USA for 20 years; currently lives in Berlin, Germany)
Lidia holds an MA in Visual and Media Anthropology from Freie Universität Berlin. Her research focus is on contemporary art, exhibition as a medium and visual culture as a platform for construction of social meanings and as visible manifestations of social processes. In 2007 Lidia co-founded ‘dmovies.net’, an online platform for researching, documenting, and presenting contemporary art practices. Presently, Lidia teaches Artistic Practice in Trans-cultural Context and DIALOGUES between art and anthropology (in co-operation with the Berlin Biennale for contemporary Art) at Freie Universität Berlin. Website

 

 

Seminar Lecture
Biennales as Constructions of Heritage
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

Globally there are over 150 contemporary art biennials, the oldest one being the Venice Biennale, Italy (since 1895). These are large-scale international exhibitions aimed at showcasing the latest movements and thoughts in local and global art production. As art institutions, the role of biennials in society is to present culture by means of not only exhibiting art, but by organizing discursive platforms, such as workshops, debates and lectures in a public social space. I explore methodology and representation that address the trans-cultural, temporal and experimental nature of art biennials and their impact on cultural heritage and society, specifically the impact on the host city. Taking a historical approach and case studies, I consider these exhibitions as media that transmit embodied artistic knowledge and trace potential inter-disciplinary correspondences and applications within a larger system of meaning.

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Klaus Zehbe (Germany)

Zehbe, Photo for Bio LectureKlaus Zehbe majored in European Theatre Arts in London (UK) and Tallinn (EE). He worked as an actor and acting tutor in Berlin. He performed among others with La Fura Dels Baus and co-founded the London-based theatre company Zecora Ura. He currently studies contemporary potentials of traditional Japanese performing arts. Furthermore Klaus Zehbe is a graduate of the Cottbus World Heritage Studies programme and worked as an academic assistant at Cottbus University’s UNESCO Chair in Heritage Studies. He is a doctoral candidate at Freie Universität Berlin. His research interests include the anthropology of education and performance, as well as heritage studies.

Lecture
The Futurity of Heritage
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 16:15 – 17:15
Video

The presentation builds on Rorty’s philosophy of language (1989) to establish a theoretical framework of how artistic interventions in the field of heritage may contribute to social change by „redescribing“ (Rorty 1989) heritage. I shall show, what kind of potentials the artistic redescription of heritage offers for changing people’s positionings to heritage in the present. I claim that from this repositioning emerges a perspective on the future, which I call following Eshel „futurity“ (2012). The presentation explores the concept of futurity in heritage studies on the basis of several examples and uses these to map out future dimensions of heritage.

Performance
Unter den Linden
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 19:30 – 19:45
Video

Zehbe, Foto Kyogen

The work-in-progress performance „Unter den Linden“ is inspired by the traditional Kyōgen dance „Yanagi no Shita“ (Under the Willow). Kyōgen is a humorous Japanese theatre form, which was included on UNESCO’s representative list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2008. It is a family-taught, highly integrated art form, which interweaves space and time through song, dance, props and costume.

Building on Morris’ sign theory stipulating that signs change their meanings when placed in a different context, the performance explores the substitution of traditional performance elements of Kyōgen with contemporary ones, while retaining core values and principles of the traditional theatrical form.

 

 

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Allison Warden (Alaska/US)

IMG_5413Allison Akootchook Warden is an Iñupiaq interdisciplinary artist who lives in Anchorage, Alaska with close ties to her mother’s Arctic home of Kaktovik, Alaska.  Environmental themes tend to permeate her work, as she performs from the perspective of the animals of the Arctic and her ancestors. Website

 

 

 

 

Performance
Calling All Polar Bears
Saturday, June 7th 2014, 20:45 – 21:45
Video

What would a polar bear say if he could talk?  How does a small Indigenous Community fight a large multi-national corporation that is intending to exploit its natural resources?  “Calling All Polar Bears” is a one-woman show by Inupiaq Eskimo Inter-Disciplinary Artist, Allison Warden, whose roots are from Kaktovik, Alaska, which is a village in the heart of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Through the show, Allison takes on the characters of animals, and of people in her village, as they bring to light the complexity surrounding climate change in the Arctic and the push to extract resources from the Arctic regions.  Indigenous communities all over the globe are facing similar challenges and “Calling All Polar Bears” hopes to engage audiences through an Inupiaq perspective and inspire audiences to think critically about these pressing issues and also hopefully take action to help fight for Indigenous sovereignty and traditional and customary ways of life.

Through humor, tears and engaging characters, “Calling All Polar Bears” takes you into the heart of the Arctic, with the hope of melting your heart towards a new perspective on the fate of the polar bears and the Inupiaq People.

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Jacqueline Heerema (Netherlands)

Jacqueline HeeremaJacqueline Heerema is a trained conceptual artist, studied museology, works as independent urban curator, is experienced in engaged large scale new heritage projects and develops interactive community based collections to develop new artistic insights that she connects to non-­artistic domains. She transformed an urban neighbourhood into ‘Museum Oostwijk’, de-constructed the classic concept of museums in ‘The Chamber of Marvels’ and is founding director and curator of Satellietgroep since 2006. She collects, connects and interconnects local knowledge on a global level and acts as a catalyst between society, arts and science.

Lecture
Innovate Heritage or Innovatory Heritage?
 Redefining arts, culture and heritage
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 10:00 – 11:00
Video

Understanding the dynamics of ‘innovatory heritage’ is basically understanding your own values, as a person, as a member of a family, a community and society and as an expert. I like to state that arts, culture and heritage belong to everybody. Not to a selections of experts. Not within walls. There are (or should be) no physical barriers for intellectual or conceptual exchange on different levels. Being aware of, even deconstruct the systems of our appreciations or values of heritage, culture and arts is essential by critical observations, understanding perceptions, interpretations and manipulations.


Michele Trimarchi (Italy)

mt m&t mi 2(1)

Michele Trimarchi, PhD, teaches Economic Analysis of Law (Catanzaro) and Cultural Economics (Bologna). Member of the editorial board of Creative Industries Journal and of Tafter Journal, he writes extensively on cultural economics and policy, and is active in the field of international cultural co-operation.

Lecture
From Ivory Towers to the Urban Texture: A map of the future culture
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 11:00 – 12:00
Video

The lecture focuses upon the radical changes occurring in the cultural system, caught in a passage between the manufacturing paradigm and the sharing economy, dominated by values such as experience, proximity and relationship. Such a change generates a new structure and operation of cultural markets, whose main features are the converging supply and the migrating demand. he reactions to this unexpected combination of opportunity and responsibility is generating varied reactions: while the mainstream culture appears to be reluctant and shows a strong preference to a steady world, a heterogeneous creative and cultural milieu is slowly but firmly invading unusual spaces and sites, aiming at reconquering the urban map, in view of a new coincidence between the physical space of heritage and the dynamic structure of the resident community.


Pablo Arboleda and Emil Bakev (Spain/Germany and Macedonia/Germany)

headshot_pabloemil_picturePablo Arboleda is an Architect from the School of Architecture of Granada – Spain, where he worked as Teaching Assistant until his graduation in 2011. His interest in inclusive urban heritage and how this is framed under an international context, leaded him to develop an internship at UN-HABITAT/New York (2012). He is a student of the World Heritage Studies Master Programme at BTU Cottbus – Germany, where he worked as a Student Tutor and held the Mentor Scholarship STIBET which focuses in supporting the International Graduate School. He is currently writing his Master Thesis on ‘ Heritage Through Urban Exploration: The Case of Abandoned Berlin’. He recently applied for the International Doctorate Programme European Urban Studies at Bauhaus-University Weimar, where he may work on his Ph.D. dissertation entitled ‘Heritage as Social Criticism. Incompiuto Siciliano: The Case of Unfinished Public Works in Sicily’.  Emil Bakev was born and raised in Skopje, the Republic of Macedonia. He studied Hospitality and Service management at the renowned RIT programme in Dubrovnik, Croatia where he divided his time between working on various charity and fundraising projects together with the university and performing at the local music scene. After spending few years in the business sector in 2012 he enrolled at the BTU Cottbus World Heritage Studies programme – a first step towards the realization of a dream about a career in academia.

Seminar Lecture
Sub-heritage: The Heritage of Subcultures. The case of urban exploration in Berlin
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

Our participation in ‘Innovative Heritage: Conversation between Arts and Heritage‘ will be divided into two parts. Firstly, the theoretical considerations of the term we have coined as ‘sub-heritage’ will be discussed. ‘Sub-heritage’ is an on-going approach attempting to take a look at heritage from an alternative perspective while involving the presence of subcultures within the recent past of contemporary societies. Secondly, it is proposed to frame this concept under the case of Berlin’s abandoned buildings, using urban exploration as an artistic practice to contribute to the arising of a contemporary visual culture.

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Anne O’Dowd (US)

AnneO'Dowd_Anne O’Dowd, based out of Seattle, Washington (US) works in cultural production and event management, currently acting as Technical Director and Production & Operations Manager at the Northwest Folklife Festival (the largest free folkarts festival in the United States). Additionally she has worked as Production and Operations Manager at the Northwest Tea Festival, the Bend-It Extravaganza, Bumbershoot music festival, Seattle Interactive Conference, Seattle Tattoo Expo, Pridefest, Capitol Hill Block Party, Freemont Fair and the Vera Project. Anne’s interests lie in accountability and equity in community relations as a part of cultural curation/production. She is often known to have a vast collection of tea at all times as well as to greatly enjoy visiting as many UNESCO World Heritage Sites as possible while traveling.

Seminar Lecture
Folk Arts Festivals and Cultural Presentation
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

This paper will discuss the interplay between performed cultural presentations and the practicalities of time, venue and space. How can these logistics create a platform for artists and communities to share their heritage? What are the important conversations and considerations to create a shared understanding of the mission and vision that tells the story as the artists and communities want to present it?

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Jazmyne Koch (Hawaii/US/Germany)

STUDIOJAZ_010

Jazmyne Koch is a cultural interdisciplinary artist, converging her background in  cultural anthropology, ethnic studies and dance into her work on contemporary  cultural identity and performance. Born in Maui, Hawai’i Jazmyne has grown up in a place that harbors diversity–different cultures, ways of thinking, island traditions and American influences–and through her artistic work speaks to these life experiences. Website

 

 

 

Seminar Lecture
Contemporary Realities of Hawaiian Performing Arts and the Role of Cultural Identity
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

As an artist interested in cultural histories, performing arts, and the relationship of people to place—attaching to their heritage and cultural identity—I look back to my family’s history and the histories of the islands where I am from, and the oral traditions that are passed down through mele (songs, chants and poems) as a way of storytelling and passing on knowledge. In Hawaiian culture, oral histories were supported by performing arts and until this day have survived through cultural practices such as the famed hula dance. We’ll look at the contemporary realities of performing arts in the Hawaiian islands and the challenges to perpetuate ancient knowledge: through traditional forms within the growing influences of American culture and western thinking, through presentation of Hawaiian culture for touristic purposes, and challenges of how to stay true to traditions while having a   contemporary voice, creating stories pertaining to today.

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Manuel Sanches (Brazil)

Edward Mason Fellow, Harvard Univerphotosity; Hubert Humphrey Fellow, Cornell University; Fulbrighter Alumnum; Leader AVINA; LEAD Fellow; Under Secretary for Urban Affairs, Rio de Janeiro City Hall, 2001; Associate Professor of the Political Science Department, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ).Botanic Garden of Rio de Janeiro, Chief of Cabinet. Cornell University, Ph.D. Candidate, Major: Urban Panning, Department of City and Regional Planning, Minor: Environmental Systems, Department of Civil Engineering, 1996;Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Master in Public Administration (MPA), 1994-1995;Cornell University, Hubert Humphrey Program in Public Administration, 1993-1994; Under Secretary for Environment and Special Projects of Rio de Janeiro State Secretariat, 1991-1993; Under-Secretary for Public Works and Services, Rio de Janeiro City Hall, 1984-1986.

Seminar Lecture
Artistic Action in Preserved Space: Cultural Identity or Touristic Trivialization?
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 13:00 – 15:00
Video

The paper analyzes the first stage of research on the “Artistic Action in Preserved Urban Spaces and the creation of a Cultural Identity: the Case of Major International Events in Rio de Janeiro.” The city of Rio de Janeiro, World Heritage as Cultural Landscape, will host the FIFA World Cup this year 2014 and the Olympic Games in 2016. The survey, started in 2013 in collaboration with the Department of Urban Theory of the Universidade Santa Úrsula, seeks to answer the following general question: “during that period, will the projects of artistic intervention seek to create, among the inhabitants, a cultural identity with the World Heritage?”

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Daisy Sutcliffe (UK)

Daisy SutcliffeDaisy is a producer and facilitator specialising in engagement.  She studied science at A-level and then moved to study Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh, specialising in music, photography and nation building in Ghana.  She spent the next ten years developing and delivering participatory arts projects in London working at the South Bank Centre and Hackney Empire amongst others, before moving to Dorset into the new post of Jurassic Coast Arts Coordinator.  She has just started a PhD in Geography at the University of Glasgow, looking at the mobilisation of creative practices around World Heritage Sites, and continues to play percussion. Website | Linked-In

 

 

Lecture
Creative Coast 2012: Natural World Heritage, international sporting events, arts programming and engaging communities
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 15:15 – 16:15
Video

In 2001 the length of the British coastline from Exmouth to Studland was designated by UNESCO as England’s first natural World Heritage Site. The designation led to an explosion of activity along the coast as local, regional and national organisations got to grips with how this could impact positively on their work. In 2005 an Interpretation Action Plan was written. This led to an ambitious Arts Strategy, which was published shortly before the announcement of London as the Olympic host for 2012 (with sailing events on the Jurassic Coast).  This led to the development of a multi-faceted Arts Programme.  Using this as a case study I will take a practical look at the issues around bringing together heritage, creativity, arts practice, community engagement and the Olympic Games. (Jurassic Coast Earth Festival Video)

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Abr Ensemble (Iran/Taiwan/Germany)

Abr EnsemblePouria Solhjou was born in the Iranian city of Kermanshah and grew up in Tehran, Iran. At the age of 15 he started to play the tanbur, one of the oldest Iranian instruments. He later studied the instrument further with other well known tanbur masters. He currently lives in Berlin.

Hui-Chun Lin comes from Kaohsiung in Taiwan. Since her childhood she learned classical piano and playing the cello. She studied cello in more depth at the Music Academy in Dresden and completed a postgraduate course for improvisation at the Musikhochschule in Leipzig. Her concerts have led her to renowned festivals for jazz, world music and improvised music in Europe, USA and Asia.

Peter Kuhnsch comes from Nuremberg, Germany. As an international percussionist, he has encountered and has great interest toward a variety of cultures and musics such as world music, old  and alternative music, jazz and experimental works. He studied percussion and drums at the Musikhochschule Leipzig and has played in many concerts among others Nereden, Rolando Villazon, Berlin Lautten Compagney, Les Passions de l’Ame, and has participated in numerous musical and theater productions, radio recordings and CD productions. As a lecturer in percussion, he teaches at the University of Music and Theater in Leipzig. Website

Performance
Abr Ensemble
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 17:30 – 18:00
Video

Abr is a Persian word meaning the cloud. The musical roots of the Berlin “Abr Ensemble” lies in the region of Kurdistan, of western Iran within the city of Kermanshah. From there comes Pouria Solhjou who plays the tanbur , a long-necked lute, and the oldest and most important instrument of the spiritual music of the Ahl-e Haqq . Pouria Solhjou is a notable expert of this type of folk music, and interprets traditional pieces as well as making his own compositions with some singing in both Kurdish and Farsi languages. Tombak and Daf among the most popular percussion instruments of Iran. Their virtuous and powerful play gives the music a more traditional color. The cello with its full, classic sound and dramatic timbre on the other hand comes from a different musical world, as Hui-Chun Lin knows well how to pick up and reflect beautifully the other facets and emotions of their music. So Abr simply unites the western and eastern sounds together with musicians from Iran, Taiwan and Germany.

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Nagiyev Shahveled ( Azerbaijan )

Nagiyev Shahveled was born in image1985. During his childhood he started to be interested in music. He was a student at the Bülbül-music school. In 2003 he started studing at the National Academy of Music and finished in 2007. He had for example the famous national singers Arif Babayev and Mäläkhanim Äyyubova as professors. In 2008 Shahveled won a song contest in Azerbaijan. Shahveled aims to publicise the azerbaijan folk music (Mugham) in foreign countries.

 

Performance
Mugham
Sunday, June 8th 2014, 17:30 – 18:00
Video

Mugham also known as Mugam is one of the many folk musical compositions from Azerbaijan. It is a highly complex art form that weds classical poetry and musical improvisation in specific local modes. “Mugham” is a modal system. Unlike Western modes, “mugham” modes are associated not only with scales but with an orally transmitted collection of melodies and melodic fragments that performers use in the course of improvisation. The choice of a particular mugham and a style of performance fits a specific event. Segah is one of the mugam frets and associated with love, romantic feelings at listener.

In 2003, UNESCO recognized mugam as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Web

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